The people of Beirut, forgotten after ISIS bombings, united by pain

The people of Beirut, forgotten after ISIS bombings, united by pain

[Read full article on Mashable]

BEIRUT, Lebanon — In the gathering dusk of the autumnal evening, the first blast tore through the busy shopping streets in Beirut’s southern suburb of Burj al-Barajneh. Within minutes, a second explosion ripped through the gathered crowd.

The twin ISIS bombings Thursday left at least 43 people dead and more than 200 wounded. Residents watched in horror as the death toll climbed sharply, quickly making them the deadliest attacks on the capital since the start of the neighbouring Syrian conflict.

Abu Ali, the owner of a falafel shop near the explosion, says his son Zain spent the evening pulling wounded, bleeding bodies out of the rubble, but paid a high price.

“His nerves are not okay now,” his father says, shaking his head as he stuffs crunchy falafel into pita pouches.Years of war and sectarian tensions have left Beirut a city divided. Neighborhoods are often known by their sect or political affiliation. A bomb going off in a city suburb can feel a million miles away for Lebanese who feel they don’t belong to the same community as the victims.

his son Zain spent the evening pulling wounded, bleeding bodies out of the rubble, but paid a high price

In the devastated street of Burj al-Barajneh, locals have left flowers at the scene of the blasts, erected banners of defiance and lit candles.

“People are saying they’re not afraid because this is their perseverance. This is their strong will. If people weren’t like this, they would have given up a long time ago,” explains Hussain, who lives near the blast site and spoke on condition that we not use his surname.

[Read full article on Mashable]

Categories: Articles.
Tags: Beirut, Beirut attacks, Burj al Berajneh, Dahiya, freelance, ISIS, Living in Lebanon, Mashable, Paris, Security, syria, and violence.

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